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Yes, we can build a composting facility for you

Do you want to build a composting facility?  Are you —

  • A private waste management company hauling 35,000 tons or more of biodegradable waste annually and paying more than the U.S. average tipping fee to dispose of that waste at a landfill,  WTE facility, or incinerator?
  • An AD system operator wanting to maximize the market potential of a low-value digestate?
  • A landfill owner hoping to extend the life of the landfill or trying to devise a strategy to meet the growing demand for food waste composting?
  • The utility director of a municipality currently hauling compostable waste to a commercial landfill or incinerator with service contracts expiring within the next few years?
  • A food processor with food waste and other biodegradables like DAF sludge and packaging waste (broken pallets, dirty cardboard, etc.) at multiple plants within 100 miles of a central location?

If the answer to any of these questions is yes, building your own composting facility may offer cost and efficiency savings, as well as long-term pricing stability for the biodegradable fraction of any waste stream,  all while offering a real revenue opportunity from the sale of high-grade compost to plump up the bottom line.

We’re not talking about throwing some clay down in a cow pasture and calling it a composting operation. We’re discussing modern, advanced technology, high-rate facilities that can handle everything from yard waste to biosolids to food waste and biodegradable plastics with aplomb.

And if you’re currently paying high tipping fees or driving long miles to dispose of this material, owning your own composting plant may be just the ticket to price-hike independence and lower costs.

These indoor, industrial operations are weather independent, providing reliable, predictable throughput.  When coupled with a modern process and professional management, they will produce a high-grade compost product with real market value for high-end customers in the golf course, turfgrass, parks and rec, retail lawn and garden, and like industries.

One of the best things about modern, environmentally-secure composting operations is that they take up very little space compared to outdoor windrows.  Ten high-rate facilities can be built within the boundaries of one outdoor windrow operation with the same throughput.   

Because of their biofiltration systems, they can also be sited much closer to population centers than the old-fashioned variety.  Contained, encapsulated processing and aerated processing systems all but eliminate headaches like leachate, off-site odors, and failed tests as management issues. This high level of control also results in a very rapid degradation process, with primary processing completed in a matter of days.

When choosing a composting system vendor, look for a firm with deep experience and a string of financially and technically successful composting operations under its belt.  Companies like McGill (which both operates its own industrial facilities and designs facilities for others) offer a definite advantage over those without these credentials.

Decades of hands-on experience processing some of the most challenging organic waste from municipal, industrial, and agricultural streams will trump a design-only firm with no operating expertise.  

McGill’s design-build options also include operations management and product marketing.   Learn more about McGill’s DBO services here.

Attract professional composters to your city’s waste management table 

Composting high volumes of source-separated organics (SSO) is not for the faint of heart.  It takes skill, experience, and science to recycle one of the messiest urban waste streams.  But while composting done right doesn’t come cheap, it is possible to build modern composting infrastructure without public financing. 

Instead of bemoaning a lack of composting infrastructure and doing nothing about it, municipalities and regional authorities can set the stage for organics diversion.   

The result?  Some of the biggest and most experienced composting companies will compete for that business. This delivers a big win for the host community: 

  • No well-intentioned but flawed “solutions” from designers and technology providers with no knowledge of biochemistry and no hands-on experience in the day-to-day operation of industrial composting facilities.  
  • No major issues with regulatory permitting when other facilities of the same type are running successfully elsewhere. 
  • … and here’s the biggie – no public financing required if the population base within 40-60 miles is large enough and the local landfill tipping fees are at or above national averages.  A community/region of around 50,000 could generate a sufficient volume of organic waste to make commercial, high-rate composting economically viable.  (View: Estimating volumes for composting) Private ownership means private financing.  Public/private ownership can also result in private financing if the public entity brings enough to the table to make joint ownership attractive to the private entity.   

But what about – 

  • Facility failure?  Structure the contract to include an option for public takeover should the owner fail to make a success of the project.  
  • Odors?  No matter the technology choice, most climates will require an indoor operation with a good biofiltration system — combined with preventive/preemptive management practices — to solve the odor problems associated with composting putrescibles.  Consider containment, collection, and treatment of air from all active work zones — off-loading to curing.  Typically, if the product has been properly composted and cured, it can be stored outdoors.  However, to preserve product quality, some manufacturers may opt for covered storage here, as well. 
  • Leachate?  Correct blending and indoor processing all but eliminate leachate as a management headache.  But do require RFP respondents to address the issue in their respective proposals. 
  • Product stockpiles?  Make sure the successful respondent has a proven track record in marketing compost in similar markets.  Just remember the sale of soil products tends to be seasonal.  Suitable acreage for large stockpiles must be included in the site plan.  Those stockpiles should dwindle significantly during the planting season(s).  But as a safety net, require a provision for distribution of volumes exceeding market demand after a reasonable market development period. 

Foster and promote compost use 

Composting is efficient, cost-effective, and the only technology offering true sustainability for biodegradable waste.  Returning organic matter to the soil to complete the recycling loop is what makes composting and compost use a sustainable system.   

But policymakers tend to get so caught up in the diversion of organics that they neglect correlating mandates for compost use. 

Compost isn’t just for farmers.  A quality compost can be used by anyone, anywhere – even urban/suburban areas: 

  • Lawns, gardens, and greenspace 
  • Parks, sports fields, and other recreation areas
  • Roadside and rest stops
  • Utility easements and rights-of-way
  • Rainwater catchment zones and pathways 

Parallel to composting infrastructure development, craft internal and external guidelines, policies, and programs to encourage regionwide compost use.   This will not only help build a product market, but also reap financial benefits to the municipality in the form of reduced costs related to stormwater management, synthetic fertilizer use, etc.