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Yes, we can build a composting facility for you

Do you want to build a composting facility?  Are you —

  • A private waste management company hauling 35,000 tons or more of biodegradable waste annually and paying more than the U.S. average tipping fee to dispose of that waste at a landfill,  WTE facility, or incinerator?
  • An AD system operator wanting to maximize the market potential of a low-value digestate?
  • A landfill owner hoping to extend the life of the landfill or trying to devise a strategy to meet the growing demand for food waste composting?
  • The utility director of a municipality currently hauling compostable waste to a commercial landfill or incinerator with service contracts expiring within the next few years?
  • A food processor with food waste and other biodegradables like DAF sludge and packaging waste (broken pallets, dirty cardboard, etc.) at multiple plants within 100 miles of a central location?

If the answer to any of these questions is yes, building your own composting facility may offer cost and efficiency savings, as well as long-term pricing stability for the biodegradable fraction of any waste stream,  all while offering a real revenue opportunity from the sale of high-grade compost to plump up the bottom line.

We’re not talking about throwing some clay down in a cow pasture and calling it a composting operation. We’re discussing modern, advanced technology, high-rate facilities that can handle everything from yard waste to biosolids to food waste and biodegradable plastics with aplomb.

And if you’re currently paying high tipping fees or driving long miles to dispose of this material, owning your own composting plant may be just the ticket to price-hike independence and lower costs.

These indoor, industrial operations are weather independent, providing reliable, predictable throughput.  When coupled with a modern process and professional management, they will produce a high-grade compost product with real market value for high-end customers in the golf course, turfgrass, parks and rec, retail lawn and garden, and like industries.

One of the best things about modern, environmentally-secure composting operations is that they take up very little space compared to outdoor windrows.  Ten high-rate facilities can be built within the boundaries of one outdoor windrow operation with the same throughput.   

Because of their biofiltration systems, they can also be sited much closer to population centers than the old-fashioned variety.  Contained, encapsulated processing and aerated processing systems all but eliminate headaches like leachate, off-site odors, and failed tests as management issues. This high level of control also results in a very rapid degradation process, with primary processing completed in a matter of days.

When choosing a composting system vendor, look for a firm with deep experience and a string of financially and technically successful composting operations under its belt.  Companies like McGill (which both operates its own industrial facilities and designs facilities for others) offer a definite advantage over those without these credentials.

Decades of hands-on experience processing some of the most challenging organic waste from municipal, industrial, and agricultural streams will trump a design-only firm with no operating expertise.  

McGill’s design-build options also include operations management and product marketing.   Learn more about McGill’s DBO services here.

What is a composting facility package plant?

In the water/wastewater treatment and composting industries, a package plant typically refers to a small, prefabricated unit dropped on-site, ready to connect to the larger system.  A McGill composting facility package plant is different.

Since McGill doesn’t build small facilities, its “package” is actually a set of blueprints and specifications for an industrial composting plant pre-engineered to meet the specific environmental containment, throughput, and feedstock requirements of the owner.

Actual construction may include prefab and off-the-shelf components, but there is likely iron going up at the site and concrete to pour, too.

While the owner is still responsible for site-specific engineering,  all other aspects – structure, process, operating procedures, etc. — are provided with the package.  Initial crew training and start-up supervision is included, too.

Pre-engineered McGill facilities ensure efficient, economical operations because they are designed by folks who have been successfully building and running trouble-free, 100,000+ TPY commercial plants for nearly 30 years.      

3 questions to ask before choosing a composting system

When evaluating choices for organics diversion, system cost tends to be a major influence in whittling down the available options.  But is capital investment a good indicator of true costs over the decades of composting facility operation?

There are many questions decision-makers need to ask before choosing a composting system.  But judging by the number of lackluster operations in existence, here are 3 biggies that don’t get asked nearly enough:

Co-mingled vs. source-separation — do you want to sell this compost?

At first glance, co-mingling organics with either the total municipal solid waste stream or with other recyclables for central separation (either pre- or post-composting) looks like a no-brainer.  No extra collections or special trucks.  No expensive outreach and education programs.

But co-mingling doesn’t work if the ultimate goal is the production of a salable compost product.  Contamination can be so high, it’s almost impossible to sell the stuff.  Sometimes, farmers won’t even take it for free.

Co-mingled may be acceptable if the objective is to dry organics prior to incineration/WTE, but destroying organic matter does nothing to increase rain infiltration across the region, store carbon, reduce reliance on synthetic chemicals or cut erosion.

But to derive the most benefit from compost use, compost manufacture must result in a high-quality product.  That means source-separation supported by a good education and enforcement program.

Does the management plan include a professional sales effort to maximize the dollar value of the compost?

An inferior compost brings in little to no revenue to offset production costs.  But a quality product, supported by a professional sales effort, can net top dollar.

The first step to getting top dollar value from product sales is to manufacture compost that falls into the premium class – dark, nutrient-rich, even-textured and odor-free.  Every manufacturing dollar spent improving an agricultural-grade product can return additional dollars in compost sales to high-value markets like landscaping, turfgrass management and stormwater management.

Before choosing a composting system, make sure that technology is capable of producing quality compost.

But that manufacturing effort will be wasted if the operation lacks a professional sales program designed and run by experienced marketers and sales pros.  Mounting an effective sales effort requires both premium product and premium people.

Hiring experienced sales pros pays off.  If faced with the choice between someone who knows compost but lacks sales experience and a sales pro with a good track record but no composting background, choose the sales pro to lead the team and put him/her in charge of the compost guru.

Why?  The right pro will be able to learn what s/he needs to structure a program and move product.  The compost person may or may not have what it takes to be successful in sales.   But working for and learning from a seasoned pro will make that compost expert the best salesperson s/he can be, generating maximum revenue for the operation.

Does the analyst’s cost:benefit considerations include the advantages of regional compost use?

Irresponsible soil management practices carry a cost.  Options for highest and best use for compost regionwide should be factors in the cost:benefit evaluation.

Analysists need to ask questions like:

  • If raising soil organic matter eliminates runoff and sedimentation from a typical rain event (1 inch or less), what impact would the use of a quality compost have on the region?
  • How could compost use influence current municipal costs to manage stormwater or treat contaminated drinking water sources?
  • What would be the savings to local farmers if they could cut their fertilizer bills in half?
  • Since compost reduces chemical use and the severity of impact injuries on playing fields, how would this influence things like maintenance budgets, player downtime and medical bills for athletic and recreation venues?

Use of compost in a region can have significant positive impact on costs for stormwater management, synthetic fertilizer and pesticide reduction, water treatment costs and much more.   Costs, cost savings and avoided costs should be discussed and considered when weighing pros and cons for a proposed project.

Decision-makers who look only at trees instead of the forest may be doing their communities a great disservice.  When reviewing analyses and recommendations prepared by staff or consultants, be sure those reports take in the big picture, not just impacts to waste management.