Noel Lyons

Noel

Sean Fallon

Sean

Gary Gittere

Gary

Kate Sullivan

Kate

Members of Team McGill are packing up for next week’s 2018 Carolinas Recycling Association (CRA) Conference, March 19-22 in Cherokee, NC.  Representing McGill Environmental Systems will be Noel Lyons, president; Sean Fallon, business development manager for intake;  Gary Gittere, sales and marketing manager for compost sales, and Kate Sullivan, compost sales rep.  Come meet some of the folks known as The Compost People®.  Flag ’em down in the hall, tag someone after a session or simply visit the McGill booth and say “Howdy!”

Transplanting can be a tricky business.  Whether moving from a greenhouse or a personal garden, plants do not care for the experience, and transplanting can sometimes trigger a disastrous response from the plant.  When the stress or damage received in the transplanting process is too much for the plant, transplant shock may result.  The plant either wins the struggle to adapt to its new home or dies. Different species and varieties of plants can handle transplanting better than others, but the threat is always present.

Usually, transplant shock can be caused by a failure to allow the plant enough time to acclimate to a new temperature. This is especially true if the plant has been raised in a protected condition such as a greenhouse. Another cause is when the roots of the plant have disturbed too much during transplant. Other factors that can make a difference include the weather conditions during the process, and the treatment the plant receives shortly after transplant.

Compost is an effective way to combat transplant shock, as the mechanisms of compost work well to help make the process go smoothly. Unlike fertilizers, compost requires fewer applications and will last longer keeping the soil healthy. The additional nutrients will also help the plant acclimate to its new home and lower stress levels. Reducing the amount of stress a plant experiences is paramount to a good transplant.

Immature/unstable composts can increase difficulties for transplants, so be sure to choose a quality, stable compost product like McGill SoilBuilder, especially if planting under plastic.

Amending soil with compost builds soil organic matter (SOM) and replenishes soil microbial populations.  Both help all types of plants –from vegetables to trees — to not only survive the “shocking” indignities of transplanting, but thrive throughout the season.

Read more about transplant shock and compost:

http://gardening.yardener.com/Compost-And-Transplants

http://www.wikihow.com/Use-Your-Compost

http://www.bartlett.com/resources/Transplant_Shock-http://www.wikihow.com/Use-Your-CompostPart_1.pdf

 

Read it.  Amended attitude: a new commitment to soil health using compost, written by Gary Gittere and recently published by SportsTurf Magazine.

ICAW – May 7-13, 2017

The International Compost Awareness Week poster for 2017 has been revealed.  Congratulations to the 2017 ICAW winning designer Ursula Gutowski from Niles, IL.

This year, the event runs May 7-13.

Green industry resellers and retailers can take advantage of Earth Day momentum by extending special compost-related promotions and educational events through mid-May.

Customers can contact their McGill sales reps for information about ordering copies of the poster for Earth Day or ICAW promotions.  We will consider requests for other types of promotional support (speakers, display materials, etc.), as well.

Not in a region served by a McGill composting facility? Keep up with the latest on the U.S. Composting Council’s  website or this Facebook page.

 

Cre recognizes McGill's 25 yearsOur thanks and warmest regards go out to Cre, the Composting Association of Ireland, for recognizing McGill for its 25 years in the composting industry.

A brief history of the company is featured in Cre’s December 2016 issue. McGill’s “cover guys” are Noel Lyons (left),  company co-founder and chairman of McGill-Ireland, and Niall Carroll, partner and manager of the McGill companies in Ireland.

In Ireland, McGill owns and operates the McGill-Glenville facility in County Cork and Molaisin Compost in County Waterford, plus 3 other composting facilities in the U.S.

All are indoor, industrial-scale operations.  McGill has also designed similar facilities for other composting companies.

Read the article