FAQ: How does compost protect drinking water?

Primary sources of drinking water include wells, lakes, reservoirs, and rivers.  Compost will protect drinking water sources by breaking down pollutants and reducing erosion/siltation in runoff.  Microbial activity and absorption of rainfall energy are among the mechanisms at work.

Soil microbes break down many chemicals — like petroleum products – during feeding activity, severing molecular bonds and reducing complex compounds into simpler, more benign forms.  In fact, compost is used to remediate petroleum contaminated soils at airbases, underground storage tank removal sites, highway accidents, and similar clean-up projects.

Compost’s organic matter content cushions rain or irrigation water.  When water hits the ground, that energy is disbursed, and fewer particles are dislodged.  That same organic matter also absorbs more water, resulting in less runoff.

In addition, the use of compost reduces the need for chemical input on farms, turfgrass, and in the landscape, which also helps to protect drinking water sources.