food waste composting includes biodegradable plasticsHarvesting practices, processing systems,  grocery store discards, food prep,  and plate scrapings all contribute to food waste.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2010 saw the generation of 34 million tons of food waste, almost 14 percent of the total municipal solid waste (MSW) stream.  Only 3 percent was recovered/recycled.  The remaining 33 million tons was wasted, the largest fraction of the total MSW stream to be landfilled or incinerated.

That same year, the U.S. composted about 20 million tons of waste. To compost all food waste currently landfilled or incinerated, we will need to more than double current capacity.  A commitment to zero waste for all organics pushes capacity requirements even higher.

But there is plenty of room at the composting table.  If the industry is to meet the challenges of zero waste, we need to fill those empty chairs.  Fortunately,  interest in collecting food waste from local restaurants, grocery stores and the like is on the rise.

In fact, every now and then, some hopeful composter will contact us.  They seek advice about getting into composting on the community level.

We always offer encouragement, and for some very good reasons.

The ‘greenest’ option may not be viable

Some of us have been environmental activists long before green became everyone’s favorite color.  We know —

  • collecting food waste from the neighborhood,
  • composting it in the neighborhood, and
  • using it to grow food on urban farms in the neighborhood

may be the most desirable option from an environmental standpoint.

But these types of micro-projects are not always practical or particularly viable. Recycling things like plastics, metals and glass is an expensive proposition.  So is recycling food waste – if you want to do it right.

The economics and/or logistics of composting sometimes prohibit action on the neighborhood level.  When that happens, a regional solution can be the best choice for crafting a disposal-to-reuse cycle that works.  Networking with proactive individuals and groups within communities presents opportunities for companies like McGill.

Voluntary collection requires route density

Most of our existing customers generate by-products and residuals by the ton.  But hauling services for low-volume commercial and residential generators are another matter.

Generally, volunteers don’t provide the volumes or route density needed to make the economics work for big tonnage haulers.  Curbside collection requires recycling mandates.

However, smaller companies and community groups are stepping up to the “plate” to fill this gap with curbside services.  They are collecting food waste and other organics by the bin or cart, transporting to permitted composting facilities like McGill.

National Organic Process Enterprises (NOPE) out of Richmond, Va., and Compost Now, based in Raleigh, N.C., are just two companies on our radar.  And there are many more popping up across the country.

It seems to be a successful model for enviropreneurs when the composting facility is located close to a metropolitan area.  No need for food waste transfer stations.

The homeowner or business is able to recycle food waste.  The collection entrepreneur builds a viable business.  We use the material to make compost.  The homeowner or community uses the compost to improve soil.  Everybody wins when we all work to lock the recycling loop for organics, including the environment.

Obviously, there is plenty of room at the composting table for operations of every size. From backyard to community to regional scale, each fills a specific niche.  All will be needed if we, as a nation, are going to stop wasting such a valuable resource.

Up next:  Food waste composting – not as easy as it sounds, not as hard as it seems.